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Distributed retrival

  1. #1
    Conrad Carlberg
    Guest

    Re: Distributed retrival

    I wouldn't do what you describe with Excel. Although Excel is a splendid
    application for analyzing and synthesizing information, it is as yet a poor
    substitute for a true database, which can work very well when it comes to
    serving multiple users at the same time and enabling them to supply new data
    on the same fields.

    Eventually, when your users have finished supplying their grades, you'll
    prefer to be working with one file only, not a different file for each user.
    In the latter case, you'll have to open the file, get that user's grades,
    and move them to another file where you can aggregate and average all the
    replies. With hundreds of users, that'll take a while.

    Excel offers a way to do that -- that is, allowing users to edit a single
    file -- but it's clumsy.

    Using Excel only, Microsoft would expect that you would distribute to your
    users shortcuts to a shared workbook -- that is, one that can be opened and
    edited by multiple simultaneous users. You would make that workbook a shared
    one by using Tools | Share Workbook, setting the options you want, and then
    re-saving the workbook. In theory, it would now be possible for Tom, ****
    and Harry to open the workbook, whether or not simultaneously, provide the
    grades that you're after, and re-save it with the same name and path..

    If the workbook is not shared, then the first user to open it can provide
    the grades and save it to its original path and filename. But if Tom opens
    it first, and either **** or Harry or both subsequently open it, **** and
    Harry will be told that Tom's using the workbook and do they want to open it
    as read-only or be notified when Tom's released it (presumably by saving his
    changes and closing it). This message differs according to the version of
    Excel that each user has. Unshared, as long as Tom has it open, **** and
    Harry will not be able to make and save their changes to the same path and
    filename.

    Theory and reality differ. There are various problems with shared Excel
    workbooks. If you are familiar with true database management systems (and
    Excel is not a true database manager), you're better off sending your users
    shortcuts to an Access (or some other) database, where they can open a table
    and provide the grades you want. A true database manager is designed to
    handle matters when Tom, **** and Harry want to edit or add records at the
    same time.

    After everyone's finished, you can copy-and-paste the data into Excel for
    analysis -- or in a very complicated situation, you can pull the data
    automatically into Excel by means of an external data range or a pivot
    table.

    --
    C^2
    Conrad Carlberg

    Excel Sales Forecasting for Dummies, Wiley, 2005


    "Ulf" <Ulf@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:8E583BC4-FC44-47E7-BCC9-F169A5951F0D@microsoft.com...
    > This might belong in Exchange rather than here but anyways:
    > I need to send out a sheet with a number of things in need of being graded
    > (1 to 5).
    > When I get them back (several hundred) I need to get the average value
    > (grade) of the returned answers. Some answers will not be entered and

    hence
    > shouldn't be used to calculate the average. Another one of the problems

    here
    > is that all the files returned might /might not have the same name.




  2. #2
    Conrad Carlberg
    Guest

    Re: Distributed retrival

    I wouldn't do what you describe with Excel. Although Excel is a splendid
    application for analyzing and synthesizing information, it is as yet a poor
    substitute for a true database, which can work very well when it comes to
    serving multiple users at the same time and enabling them to supply new data
    on the same fields.

    Eventually, when your users have finished supplying their grades, you'll
    prefer to be working with one file only, not a different file for each user.
    In the latter case, you'll have to open the file, get that user's grades,
    and move them to another file where you can aggregate and average all the
    replies. With hundreds of users, that'll take a while.

    Excel offers a way to do that -- that is, allowing users to edit a single
    file -- but it's clumsy.

    Using Excel only, Microsoft would expect that you would distribute to your
    users shortcuts to a shared workbook -- that is, one that can be opened and
    edited by multiple simultaneous users. You would make that workbook a shared
    one by using Tools | Share Workbook, setting the options you want, and then
    re-saving the workbook. In theory, it would now be possible for Tom, ****
    and Harry to open the workbook, whether or not simultaneously, provide the
    grades that you're after, and re-save it with the same name and path..

    If the workbook is not shared, then the first user to open it can provide
    the grades and save it to its original path and filename. But if Tom opens
    it first, and either **** or Harry or both subsequently open it, **** and
    Harry will be told that Tom's using the workbook and do they want to open it
    as read-only or be notified when Tom's released it (presumably by saving his
    changes and closing it). This message differs according to the version of
    Excel that each user has. Unshared, as long as Tom has it open, **** and
    Harry will not be able to make and save their changes to the same path and
    filename.

    Theory and reality differ. There are various problems with shared Excel
    workbooks. If you are familiar with true database management systems (and
    Excel is not a true database manager), you're better off sending your users
    shortcuts to an Access (or some other) database, where they can open a table
    and provide the grades you want. A true database manager is designed to
    handle matters when Tom, **** and Harry want to edit or add records at the
    same time.

    After everyone's finished, you can copy-and-paste the data into Excel for
    analysis -- or in a very complicated situation, you can pull the data
    automatically into Excel by means of an external data range or a pivot
    table.

    --
    C^2
    Conrad Carlberg

    Excel Sales Forecasting for Dummies, Wiley, 2005


    "Ulf" <Ulf@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:8E583BC4-FC44-47E7-BCC9-F169A5951F0D@microsoft.com...
    > This might belong in Exchange rather than here but anyways:
    > I need to send out a sheet with a number of things in need of being graded
    > (1 to 5).
    > When I get them back (several hundred) I need to get the average value
    > (grade) of the returned answers. Some answers will not be entered and

    hence
    > shouldn't be used to calculate the average. Another one of the problems

    here
    > is that all the files returned might /might not have the same name.




  3. #3
    Ulf
    Guest

    Distributed retrival

    This might belong in Exchange rather than here but anyways:
    I need to send out a sheet with a number of things in need of being graded
    (1 to 5).
    When I get them back (several hundred) I need to get the average value
    (grade) of the returned answers. Some answers will not be entered and hence
    shouldn't be used to calculate the average. Another one of the problems here
    is that all the files returned might /might not have the same name.

  4. #4
    Conrad Carlberg
    Guest

    Re: Distributed retrival

    I wouldn't do what you describe with Excel. Although Excel is a splendid
    application for analyzing and synthesizing information, it is as yet a poor
    substitute for a true database, which can work very well when it comes to
    serving multiple users at the same time and enabling them to supply new data
    on the same fields.

    Eventually, when your users have finished supplying their grades, you'll
    prefer to be working with one file only, not a different file for each user.
    In the latter case, you'll have to open the file, get that user's grades,
    and move them to another file where you can aggregate and average all the
    replies. With hundreds of users, that'll take a while.

    Excel offers a way to do that -- that is, allowing users to edit a single
    file -- but it's clumsy.

    Using Excel only, Microsoft would expect that you would distribute to your
    users shortcuts to a shared workbook -- that is, one that can be opened and
    edited by multiple simultaneous users. You would make that workbook a shared
    one by using Tools | Share Workbook, setting the options you want, and then
    re-saving the workbook. In theory, it would now be possible for Tom, ****
    and Harry to open the workbook, whether or not simultaneously, provide the
    grades that you're after, and re-save it with the same name and path..

    If the workbook is not shared, then the first user to open it can provide
    the grades and save it to its original path and filename. But if Tom opens
    it first, and either **** or Harry or both subsequently open it, **** and
    Harry will be told that Tom's using the workbook and do they want to open it
    as read-only or be notified when Tom's released it (presumably by saving his
    changes and closing it). This message differs according to the version of
    Excel that each user has. Unshared, as long as Tom has it open, **** and
    Harry will not be able to make and save their changes to the same path and
    filename.

    Theory and reality differ. There are various problems with shared Excel
    workbooks. If you are familiar with true database management systems (and
    Excel is not a true database manager), you're better off sending your users
    shortcuts to an Access (or some other) database, where they can open a table
    and provide the grades you want. A true database manager is designed to
    handle matters when Tom, **** and Harry want to edit or add records at the
    same time.

    After everyone's finished, you can copy-and-paste the data into Excel for
    analysis -- or in a very complicated situation, you can pull the data
    automatically into Excel by means of an external data range or a pivot
    table.

    --
    C^2
    Conrad Carlberg

    Excel Sales Forecasting for Dummies, Wiley, 2005


    "Ulf" <Ulf@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:8E583BC4-FC44-47E7-BCC9-F169A5951F0D@microsoft.com...
    > This might belong in Exchange rather than here but anyways:
    > I need to send out a sheet with a number of things in need of being graded
    > (1 to 5).
    > When I get them back (several hundred) I need to get the average value
    > (grade) of the returned answers. Some answers will not be entered and

    hence
    > shouldn't be used to calculate the average. Another one of the problems

    here
    > is that all the files returned might /might not have the same name.




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