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Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

  1. #1
    PJF
    Guest

    Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

    Using the geographic coordinates for each, I've "translated" the FCC
    procedure for determining the distance between two transmitters ( per FCC
    73.208) into Excel formulas. Excel gives identical distance results to the
    "fill-in" form provided in www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html . But
    there is no comparable formula in the FCC R&R for determining the bearing
    (azimuth) between the stations relative to true north, although the FCC's
    fill-in form does provide azimuth.

    My problem with using the fill-in form is that I have hundreds of
    computations to make and I'd spend untold hours using the fill-in form for
    one pair of stations at a time. If I can get a formula for determining the
    azimuth relative to true north based on the geographic coordinate pairs, I
    can whip this puppy in no time at all with Excel.

    Any solutions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks and regards,

    PJF



  2. #2
    Bernard Liengme
    Guest

    Re: Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

    A somewhat esoteric question for this group. Have a look at what Chip has to
    say about lat & long on his site www.cpearson.com
    best wishes
    --
    Bernard V Liengme
    www.stfx.ca/people/bliengme
    remove caps from email

    "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:t83_e.4390$vw6.2812@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > Using the geographic coordinates for each, I've "translated" the FCC
    > procedure for determining the distance between two transmitters ( per FCC
    > 73.208) into Excel formulas. Excel gives identical distance results to
    > the
    > "fill-in" form provided in www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html . But
    > there is no comparable formula in the FCC R&R for determining the bearing
    > (azimuth) between the stations relative to true north, although the FCC's
    > fill-in form does provide azimuth.
    >
    > My problem with using the fill-in form is that I have hundreds of
    > computations to make and I'd spend untold hours using the fill-in form for
    > one pair of stations at a time. If I can get a formula for determining
    > the
    > azimuth relative to true north based on the geographic coordinate pairs, I
    > can whip this puppy in no time at all with Excel.
    >
    > Any solutions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    >
    > Thanks and regards,
    >
    > PJF
    >
    >




  3. #3
    PJF
    Guest

    Re: Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

    Thanks, Bernard. I will check Chip's site (as I have for many other Excel
    related questions). That may be just the ticket!

    Regrds,

    PJF



    "Bernard Liengme" <bliengme@stfx.TRUENORTH.ca> wrote in message
    news:uHTDet2wFHA.3772@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > A somewhat esoteric question for this group. Have a look at what Chip has

    to
    > say about lat & long on his site www.cpearson.com
    > best wishes
    > --
    > Bernard V Liengme
    > www.stfx.ca/people/bliengme
    > remove caps from email
    >
    > "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > news:t83_e.4390$vw6.2812@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > > Using the geographic coordinates for each, I've "translated" the FCC
    > > procedure for determining the distance between two transmitters ( per

    FCC
    > > 73.208) into Excel formulas. Excel gives identical distance results to
    > > the
    > > "fill-in" form provided in www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html .

    But
    > > there is no comparable formula in the FCC R&R for determining the

    bearing
    > > (azimuth) between the stations relative to true north, although the

    FCC's
    > > fill-in form does provide azimuth.
    > >
    > > My problem with using the fill-in form is that I have hundreds of
    > > computations to make and I'd spend untold hours using the fill-in form

    for
    > > one pair of stations at a time. If I can get a formula for determining
    > > the
    > > azimuth relative to true north based on the geographic coordinate pairs,

    I
    > > can whip this puppy in no time at all with Excel.
    > >
    > > Any solutions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    > >
    > > Thanks and regards,
    > >
    > > PJF
    > >
    > >

    >
    >




  4. #4
    Dana DeLouis
    Guest

    Re: Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

    If you don't find it, perhaps this equation for the initial azimuth:

    =ASIN(COS(Lat2)*SIN(Distance)/SIN(Long2-Long1))

    The distance is in degrees that you calculated earlier. This assumes a
    spherical earth, as I'm not familiar if the web site is using advances
    calculations. I can't find my old notes, but you need to add that a
    negative number is to the left of true north (360-n), and a positive number
    is to the right of true north (0+n)
    That web site doesn't display distance units, but it looks like the
    distances are in "Statue Miles"

    HTH :>)
    --
    Dana DeLouis
    Win XP & Office 2003


    "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    news:yyc_e.4551$vw6.2174@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > Thanks, Bernard. I will check Chip's site (as I have for many other Excel
    > related questions). That may be just the ticket!
    >
    > Regrds,
    >
    > PJF
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bernard Liengme" <bliengme@stfx.TRUENORTH.ca> wrote in message
    > news:uHTDet2wFHA.3772@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >> A somewhat esoteric question for this group. Have a look at what Chip has

    > to
    >> say about lat & long on his site www.cpearson.com
    >> best wishes
    >> --
    >> Bernard V Liengme
    >> www.stfx.ca/people/bliengme
    >> remove caps from email
    >>
    >> "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    >> news:t83_e.4390$vw6.2812@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    >> > Using the geographic coordinates for each, I've "translated" the FCC
    >> > procedure for determining the distance between two transmitters ( per

    > FCC
    >> > 73.208) into Excel formulas. Excel gives identical distance results to
    >> > the
    >> > "fill-in" form provided in www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html .

    > But
    >> > there is no comparable formula in the FCC R&R for determining the

    > bearing
    >> > (azimuth) between the stations relative to true north, although the

    > FCC's
    >> > fill-in form does provide azimuth.
    >> >
    >> > My problem with using the fill-in form is that I have hundreds of
    >> > computations to make and I'd spend untold hours using the fill-in form

    > for
    >> > one pair of stations at a time. If I can get a formula for determining
    >> > the
    >> > azimuth relative to true north based on the geographic coordinate
    >> > pairs,

    > I
    >> > can whip this puppy in no time at all with Excel.
    >> >
    >> > Any solutions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks and regards,
    >> >
    >> > PJF
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>

    >
    >




  5. #5
    PJF
    Guest

    Re: Excel Formula for determining azimuth relative to true north between two sets of geographic coordinates?

    Dana,

    Many thanks. This helps to focus in on finding an equation that solves the
    problem.

    Kindest regards,

    PJF


    "Dana DeLouis" <delouis@bellsouth.net> wrote in message
    news:ewBxnd3wFHA.2076@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > If you don't find it, perhaps this equation for the initial azimuth:
    >
    > =ASIN(COS(Lat2)*SIN(Distance)/SIN(Long2-Long1))
    >
    > The distance is in degrees that you calculated earlier. This assumes a
    > spherical earth, as I'm not familiar if the web site is using advances
    > calculations. I can't find my old notes, but you need to add that a
    > negative number is to the left of true north (360-n), and a positive

    number
    > is to the right of true north (0+n)
    > That web site doesn't display distance units, but it looks like the
    > distances are in "Statue Miles"
    >
    > HTH :>)
    > --
    > Dana DeLouis
    > Win XP & Office 2003
    >
    >
    > "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > news:yyc_e.4551$vw6.2174@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > > Thanks, Bernard. I will check Chip's site (as I have for many other

    Excel
    > > related questions). That may be just the ticket!
    > >
    > > Regrds,
    > >
    > > PJF
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > "Bernard Liengme" <bliengme@stfx.TRUENORTH.ca> wrote in message
    > > news:uHTDet2wFHA.3772@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > >> A somewhat esoteric question for this group. Have a look at what Chip

    has
    > > to
    > >> say about lat & long on his site www.cpearson.com
    > >> best wishes
    > >> --
    > >> Bernard V Liengme
    > >> www.stfx.ca/people/bliengme
    > >> remove caps from email
    > >>
    > >> "PJF" <pjfnospam@earthlink.net> wrote in message
    > >> news:t83_e.4390$vw6.2812@newsread1.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > >> > Using the geographic coordinates for each, I've "translated" the FCC
    > >> > procedure for determining the distance between two transmitters ( per

    > > FCC
    > >> > 73.208) into Excel formulas. Excel gives identical distance results

    to
    > >> > the
    > >> > "fill-in" form provided in www.fcc.gov/mb/audio/bickel/distance.html

    ..
    > > But
    > >> > there is no comparable formula in the FCC R&R for determining the

    > > bearing
    > >> > (azimuth) between the stations relative to true north, although the

    > > FCC's
    > >> > fill-in form does provide azimuth.
    > >> >
    > >> > My problem with using the fill-in form is that I have hundreds of
    > >> > computations to make and I'd spend untold hours using the fill-in

    form
    > > for
    > >> > one pair of stations at a time. If I can get a formula for

    determining
    > >> > the
    > >> > azimuth relative to true north based on the geographic coordinate
    > >> > pairs,

    > > I
    > >> > can whip this puppy in no time at all with Excel.
    > >> >
    > >> > Any solutions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
    > >> >
    > >> > Thanks and regards,
    > >> >
    > >> > PJF
    > >> >
    > >> >
    > >>
    > >>

    > >
    > >

    >
    >




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