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why Microsoft Excel can't support if() multiple choices more then.

  1. #1
    reneabesmer
    Guest

    why Microsoft Excel can't support if() multiple choices more then.

    why Microsoft Excel can't support if() function for thousands of mulitple
    choice without VBA coding


  2. #2
    Myrna Larson
    Guest

    Re: why Microsoft Excel can't support if() multiple choices more then.

    Why? Because the programmers didn't "teach" it how to do that. They provided
    the CHOOSE, HLOOKUP, VLOOKUP, and LOOKUP, and MATCH functions which may solve
    you problem if you describe what it is.

    On Mon, 18 Apr 2005 21:25:01 -0700, "reneabesmer"
    <reneabesmer@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >why Microsoft Excel can't support if() function for thousands of mulitple
    >choice without VBA coding



  3. #3
    Bob Phillips
    Guest

    Re: why Microsoft Excel can't support if() multiple choices more then.

    Because there are always limits (65000+ rows, characters in a cell,
    worksheets in a book, etc.). We may not like the limits, but surely we can
    understand that not everything can be unlimited. In this instance there are
    so many alternatives that it does not even seem necessary to request MS to
    provide more, there are more pressing needs (more than 3 conditional formats
    for instance).

    --

    HTH

    RP
    (remove nothere from the email address if mailing direct)


    "reneabesmer" <reneabesmer@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:162D50B0-FA7B-4117-9288-CB4C5240AE48@microsoft.com...
    > why Microsoft Excel can't support if() function for thousands of mulitple
    > choice without VBA coding
    >




  4. #4
    Amedee Van Gasse
    Guest

    Re: why Microsoft Excel can't support if() multiple choices more then.

    reneabesmer shared this with us in microsoft.public.excel.programming:

    > why Microsoft Excel can't support if() function for thousands of
    > mulitple choice without VBA coding


    You raise a well thought criticism.

    A Really Good Design[0] allows either Zero, One, or Infinity[1]. If Two
    is allowed, it can be argumented that Three would also be acceptable,
    and why not Four, ad infinitum.

    However, this is only theory. In the Real World, programmers have to do
    concessions. Sometimes a fixed limitation is used so that more
    optimi(s|z)ed algorithms can be used, with a faster program as a
    result. A theoretical Good Design is not always the fastest design.

    When a limitation has to be chosen, you'll usually see a power of two
    in an Almost As Good Design (or sometimes a power of two -1). In the
    case of Excel you can use 8 nested if() functions: 8 = 2^3, and 8 is
    also the number of bits in one byte. On a similar matter, please read
    http://j-walk.com/ss/excel/odd/odd13.htm


    [0] I use capitals to indicate abstract concepts. You shouldn't
    interpret the capitali(s|z)ed words literally. Think "Discworld" (Terry
    Pratchett) to grep the context.
    [1] only limited by memory, disk space, or other physical limitations.

    --
    Amedee Van Gasse using XanaNews 1.17.3.1
    If it has an "X" in the name, it must be Linux?

    How To Ask Questions The Smart Way
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    How to Report Bugs Effectively
    http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/bugs.html
    Only ask questions with yes/no answers if you want "yes" or "no" as the
    answer.
    http://homepages.tesco.net/~J.deBoyn...-with-yes-or-n
    o-answers.html

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