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Writing a simple macro or formula

  1. #1
    Robin
    Guest

    Writing a simple macro or formula

    Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to write a
    simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that pretty
    as I am the only one using it. It is the following:

    STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    needed/24 hrs


    So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro" give me
    the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And yes I
    can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it quicker and
    check myself.

    Thanks
    Robin

  2. #2
    M C Del Papa
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula

    Robin,

    You definitely don't need a macro to do this. A simple formula using some
    IF...THEN statements will do fine. Below is one approach (note I skipped
    some rows and columns so you can add headings, etc.):

    Enter wt in cell B3
    Convert to kg in B4: =B3*0.453593

    Enter desired fluid rate for 1st 10 kg in B7
    Calculate fluid rate in C7: =IF(B3>=10,10*B7,B3*B7)
    Enter desired fluid rate for 2nd 10 kg in B8
    Calculate fluid rate in C8: =IF(B3>=20,10*B8,IF(B3>=10,(B3-10)*B8,0))
    Enter desired fluid rate for >20 kg in B9
    Calculate fluid rate in C9: =IF(B3>=20,(B3-20)*B9,0)

    Sum in cell C10 to get the total fluid rate: =SUM(C7:C9)

    MC

    "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    > Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to write
    > a
    > simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that
    > pretty
    > as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    >
    > STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    > 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    > 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    > 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    > 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    > 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    > needed/24 hrs
    >
    >
    > So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro" give
    > me
    > the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And yes
    > I
    > can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it quicker
    > and
    > check myself.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Robin




  3. #3
    MC
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula

    Oops! Make sure to change all the B3 references in the IF...THEN statements
    to reference B4.

    MC

    "M C Del Papa" <mdelpapa@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:%6PCf.19607$Jd.19519@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
    > Robin,
    >
    > You definitely don't need a macro to do this. A simple formula using some
    > IF...THEN statements will do fine. Below is one approach (note I skipped
    > some rows and columns so you can add headings, etc.):
    >
    > Enter wt in cell B3
    > Convert to kg in B4: =B3*0.453593
    >
    > Enter desired fluid rate for 1st 10 kg in B7
    > Calculate fluid rate in C7: =IF(B3>=10,10*B7,B3*B7)
    > Enter desired fluid rate for 2nd 10 kg in B8
    > Calculate fluid rate in C8: =IF(B3>=20,10*B8,IF(B3>=10,(B3-10)*B8,0))
    > Enter desired fluid rate for >20 kg in B9
    > Calculate fluid rate in C9: =IF(B3>=20,(B3-20)*B9,0)
    >
    > Sum in cell C10 to get the total fluid rate: =SUM(C7:C9)
    >
    > MC
    >
    > "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    >> Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to
    >> write a
    >> simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that
    >> pretty
    >> as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    >>
    >> STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    >> 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    >> 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    >> 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    >> 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    >> 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    >> needed/24 hrs
    >>
    >>
    >> So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro" give
    >> me
    >> the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And yes
    >> I
    >> can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it quicker
    >> and
    >> check myself.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >> Robin

    >
    >




  4. #4
    Dirk Van de moortel
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula


    "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    > Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to write a
    > simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that pretty
    > as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    >
    > STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    > 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    > 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    > 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    > 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    > 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    > needed/24 hrs
    >
    >
    > So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro" give me
    > the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And yes I
    > can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it quicker and
    > check myself.
    >
    > Thanks
    > Robin


    Supposing you put the weight in pounds in column A
    and supposing 1 pound is 0.45359 kg,
    in cell B1:
    = 0.45359 * a1
    in cell C1:
    = IF( B1>=10, 100, 0 )
    in cell D1:
    = IF( B1>=20, 50, 0 )
    in cell E1:
    = IF( B1>=20, 10*(B1-20), 0 )
    in cell F1:
    = C1 + D1 + E1

    Or, if you don't want the intermediate columns:
    in cell C1:
    = IF( B1>=10, 100, 0 ) + IF( B1>=20, 50, 0 ) + IF( B1>=20, 10*(B1-20), 0 )

    But I'm not sure what you mean with "Calculate 10 to 25 ml",
    so I have taken 10.

    hth
    Dirk Vdm



  5. #5
    Dirk Van de moortel
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula


    "Dirk Van de moortel" <dirkvandemoortel@ThankS-NO-SperM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:%fPCf.216616$3m3.7130145@phobos.telenet-ops.be...

    [snip]

    >
    > Or, if you don't want the intermediate columns:
    > in cell C1:
    > = IF( B1>=10, 100, 0 ) + IF( B1>=20, 50, 0 ) + IF( B1>=20, 10*(B1-20), 0 )


    which can be shortened to
    = IF( B1>=10, 100, 0 ) + IF( B1>=20, 50+10*(B1-20), 0 )

    Dirk Vdm



  6. #6
    Robin
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula

    Your formula is close - I have figured it out with pencil and paper and it
    is very close but I am just trying to figure out a volume not a rate - so the
    only value I have to input is the 15 pounds. From that all of the numbers
    should fall out. So on paper it looks like this.

    This is the problem:

    1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    needed/24 hrs

    This is the solution on paper:

    Maintenance Fluids
    15lb – 28.4ml/hr for a total of 681.6ml/24 hours
    40lb – 58.6ml/hr for a total of 1,406.4ml/24 hours
    70lb – 72.3ml/hr for a total of 1,735.2ml/24 hours

    So again the only input is the weight in pounds.

    You are so kind to help me and I hope this will not offend you. Thanks for
    taking another look at it. I am using your suggestions and trying to build it
    from there but I think it is hard to understand without a medical background.
    If the child ends up not weighing over 10kg then the amount of fluid is just
    100ml/kg, but if the child weighs more than 20kg then I have to figure 100ml
    for the 10kg + 50ml for the next 10kg + 20ml for each additional kg.

    I think we are so on the right track - just a little refining. I used to
    write stuff in Excel all the time but that was a long time ago and I just
    don't remember it anymore. Again THANKS SO MUCH for looking at this.

    "MC" wrote:

    > Oops! Make sure to change all the B3 references in the IF...THEN statements
    > to reference B4.
    >
    > MC
    >
    > "M C Del Papa" <mdelpapa@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    > news:%6PCf.19607$Jd.19519@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
    > > Robin,
    > >
    > > You definitely don't need a macro to do this. A simple formula using some
    > > IF...THEN statements will do fine. Below is one approach (note I skipped
    > > some rows and columns so you can add headings, etc.):
    > >
    > > Enter wt in cell B3
    > > Convert to kg in B4: =B3*0.453593
    > >
    > > Enter desired fluid rate for 1st 10 kg in B7
    > > Calculate fluid rate in C7: =IF(B3>=10,10*B7,B3*B7)
    > > Enter desired fluid rate for 2nd 10 kg in B8
    > > Calculate fluid rate in C8: =IF(B3>=20,10*B8,IF(B3>=10,(B3-10)*B8,0))
    > > Enter desired fluid rate for >20 kg in B9
    > > Calculate fluid rate in C9: =IF(B3>=20,(B3-20)*B9,0)
    > >
    > > Sum in cell C10 to get the total fluid rate: =SUM(C7:C9)
    > >
    > > MC
    > >
    > > "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > > news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    > >> Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to
    > >> write a
    > >> simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that
    > >> pretty
    > >> as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    > >>
    > >> STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    > >> 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    > >> 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    > >> 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    > >> 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    > >> 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    > >> needed/24 hrs
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro" give
    > >> me
    > >> the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And yes
    > >> I
    > >> can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it quicker
    > >> and
    > >> check myself.
    > >>
    > >> Thanks
    > >> Robin

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
    >


  7. #7
    MC
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula

    Robin,

    I checked my answers against the ones we gave for 15, 40, and 70 lbs and got
    basically the same answers with small rounding errors due to Excel's
    12-digit precision versus hand calculations. Perhaps my earlier response was
    confusing. You only have to enter numbers one time in Excel and from there
    forward if you want to only change the weight, the spreadsheet calculations
    will flow all the way through. There is no need to re-enter numbers
    previously entered if they do not change. This is the beauty of Excel.
    However, if you prefer a single formula that simply takes the child's weight
    and calculates the fluid then it would be the following:

    Enter the weight in pounds in cell B3
    Copy the following formula to any cell:
    =(IF(B3*0.453593>=10,10*100/24,B3*0.453593*100/24)+IF(B3*0.453593>=20,10*50/24,IF(B3*0.453593>=10,(B3*0.453593-10)*50/24,0))+IF(B3*0.453593>=20,(B3*0.453593-20)*20/24,0))*24

    As you can see it is pretty long, but get's the job done. I initially
    structured my response to allow the flexibility of changing the fluid rates
    because you sounded like the amount of fluid above 20 kg could range between
    10 to 25 ml/kg/24 hr. The disadvantage of the formula above is 20 ml/kg/24
    hr is hardcoded into the formula. Therefore if you wanted to change this
    value you would have to edit the formula in Excel which is far from an
    elegant approach subject to mistakes and I would not recommend it.

    Hope this helps!

    MC

    "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:9F38B9F5-B80A-49EB-B568-B8561AAB1814@microsoft.com...
    > Your formula is close - I have figured it out with pencil and paper and
    > it
    > is very close but I am just trying to figure out a volume not a rate - so
    > the
    > only value I have to input is the 15 pounds. From that all of the numbers
    > should fall out. So on paper it looks like this.
    >
    > This is the problem:
    >
    > 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    > 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    > 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    > 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    > 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    > needed/24 hrs
    >
    > This is the solution on paper:
    >
    > Maintenance Fluids
    > 15lb - 28.4ml/hr for a total of 681.6ml/24 hours
    > 40lb - 58.6ml/hr for a total of 1,406.4ml/24 hours
    > 70lb - 72.3ml/hr for a total of 1,735.2ml/24 hours
    >
    > So again the only input is the weight in pounds.
    >
    > You are so kind to help me and I hope this will not offend you. Thanks
    > for
    > taking another look at it. I am using your suggestions and trying to build
    > it
    > from there but I think it is hard to understand without a medical
    > background.
    > If the child ends up not weighing over 10kg then the amount of fluid is
    > just
    > 100ml/kg, but if the child weighs more than 20kg then I have to figure
    > 100ml
    > for the 10kg + 50ml for the next 10kg + 20ml for each additional kg.
    >
    > I think we are so on the right track - just a little refining. I used to
    > write stuff in Excel all the time but that was a long time ago and I just
    > don't remember it anymore. Again THANKS SO MUCH for looking at this.
    >
    > "MC" wrote:
    >
    >> Oops! Make sure to change all the B3 references in the IF...THEN
    >> statements
    >> to reference B4.
    >>
    >> MC
    >>
    >> "M C Del Papa" <mdelpapa@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    >> news:%6PCf.19607$Jd.19519@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
    >> > Robin,
    >> >
    >> > You definitely don't need a macro to do this. A simple formula using
    >> > some
    >> > IF...THEN statements will do fine. Below is one approach (note I
    >> > skipped
    >> > some rows and columns so you can add headings, etc.):
    >> >
    >> > Enter wt in cell B3
    >> > Convert to kg in B4: =B3*0.453593
    >> >
    >> > Enter desired fluid rate for 1st 10 kg in B7
    >> > Calculate fluid rate in C7: =IF(B3>=10,10*B7,B3*B7)
    >> > Enter desired fluid rate for 2nd 10 kg in B8
    >> > Calculate fluid rate in C8: =IF(B3>=20,10*B8,IF(B3>=10,(B3-10)*B8,0))
    >> > Enter desired fluid rate for >20 kg in B9
    >> > Calculate fluid rate in C9: =IF(B3>=20,(B3-20)*B9,0)
    >> >
    >> > Sum in cell C10 to get the total fluid rate: =SUM(C7:C9)
    >> >
    >> > MC
    >> >
    >> > "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> > news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    >> >> Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to
    >> >> write a
    >> >> simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that
    >> >> pretty
    >> >> as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    >> >>
    >> >> STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    >> >> 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    >> >> 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    >> >> 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    >> >> 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    >> >> 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    >> >> needed/24 hrs
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro"
    >> >> give
    >> >> me
    >> >> the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And
    >> >> yes
    >> >> I
    >> >> can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it
    >> >> quicker
    >> >> and
    >> >> check myself.
    >> >>
    >> >> Thanks
    >> >> Robin
    >> >
    >> >

    >>
    >>
    >>




  8. #8
    Dana DeLouis
    Guest

    Re: Writing a simple macro or formula

    Hi. If I am not mistaken, I think the values above 20 are double-added. I
    get slightly different answers.
    I'll take a crack at it, but I may be wrong...
    For this example, enter a weight in pounds in A1. In another cell with a
    range name "kg", enter...

    =CONVERT(A1,"lbm","kg")

    The Op wasn't clear on what value he was using for over 20, but I'll call
    that value "Q".
    If we set "Q" equal to about 20, we get values that are close to his
    example...
    Here is your excellent equation slightly modified:

    =MIN((25*Kg)/6,(25*(Kg+10))/12,(Q*(Kg-20)+1500)/24)

    I like to use Range Names when the equation gets a little out of hand...
    Hope I got this right...
    --
    HTH. :>)

    Dana DeLouis
    Windows XP, Office 2003


    "MC" <temp1212@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    news:V1SCf.39804$dW3.35468@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
    > Robin,
    >
    > I checked my answers against the ones we gave for 15, 40, and 70 lbs and
    > got basically the same answers with small rounding errors due to Excel's
    > 12-digit precision versus hand calculations. Perhaps my earlier response
    > was confusing. You only have to enter numbers one time in Excel and from
    > there forward if you want to only change the weight, the spreadsheet
    > calculations will flow all the way through. There is no need to re-enter
    > numbers previously entered if they do not change. This is the beauty of
    > Excel. However, if you prefer a single formula that simply takes the
    > child's weight and calculates the fluid then it would be the following:
    >
    > Enter the weight in pounds in cell B3
    > Copy the following formula to any cell:
    > =(IF(B3*0.453593>=10,10*100/24,B3*0.453593*100/24)+IF(B3*0.453593>=20,10*50/24,IF(B3*0.453593>=10,(B3*0.453593-10)*50/24,0))+IF(B3*0.453593>=20,(B3*0.453593-20)*20/24,0))*24
    >
    > As you can see it is pretty long, but get's the job done. I initially
    > structured my response to allow the flexibility of changing the fluid
    > rates because you sounded like the amount of fluid above 20 kg could range
    > between 10 to 25 ml/kg/24 hr. The disadvantage of the formula above is 20
    > ml/kg/24 hr is hardcoded into the formula. Therefore if you wanted to
    > change this value you would have to edit the formula in Excel which is far
    > from an elegant approach subject to mistakes and I would not recommend it.
    >
    > Hope this helps!
    >
    > MC
    >
    > "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:9F38B9F5-B80A-49EB-B568-B8561AAB1814@microsoft.com...
    >> Your formula is close - I have figured it out with pencil and paper and
    >> it
    >> is very close but I am just trying to figure out a volume not a rate - so
    >> the
    >> only value I have to input is the 15 pounds. From that all of the
    >> numbers
    >> should fall out. So on paper it looks like this.
    >>
    >> This is the problem:
    >>
    >> 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    >> 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    >> 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    >> 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    >> 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    >> needed/24 hrs
    >>
    >> This is the solution on paper:
    >>
    >> Maintenance Fluids
    >> 15lb - 28.4ml/hr for a total of 681.6ml/24 hours
    >> 40lb - 58.6ml/hr for a total of 1,406.4ml/24 hours
    >> 70lb - 72.3ml/hr for a total of 1,735.2ml/24 hours
    >>
    >> So again the only input is the weight in pounds.
    >>
    >> You are so kind to help me and I hope this will not offend you. Thanks
    >> for
    >> taking another look at it. I am using your suggestions and trying to
    >> build it
    >> from there but I think it is hard to understand without a medical
    >> background.
    >> If the child ends up not weighing over 10kg then the amount of fluid is
    >> just
    >> 100ml/kg, but if the child weighs more than 20kg then I have to figure
    >> 100ml
    >> for the 10kg + 50ml for the next 10kg + 20ml for each additional kg.
    >>
    >> I think we are so on the right track - just a little refining. I used to
    >> write stuff in Excel all the time but that was a long time ago and I just
    >> don't remember it anymore. Again THANKS SO MUCH for looking at this.
    >>
    >> "MC" wrote:
    >>
    >>> Oops! Make sure to change all the B3 references in the IF...THEN
    >>> statements
    >>> to reference B4.
    >>>
    >>> MC
    >>>
    >>> "M C Del Papa" <mdelpapa@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
    >>> news:%6PCf.19607$Jd.19519@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
    >>> > Robin,
    >>> >
    >>> > You definitely don't need a macro to do this. A simple formula using
    >>> > some
    >>> > IF...THEN statements will do fine. Below is one approach (note I
    >>> > skipped
    >>> > some rows and columns so you can add headings, etc.):
    >>> >
    >>> > Enter wt in cell B3
    >>> > Convert to kg in B4: =B3*0.453593
    >>> >
    >>> > Enter desired fluid rate for 1st 10 kg in B7
    >>> > Calculate fluid rate in C7: =IF(B3>=10,10*B7,B3*B7)
    >>> > Enter desired fluid rate for 2nd 10 kg in B8
    >>> > Calculate fluid rate in C8: =IF(B3>=20,10*B8,IF(B3>=10,(B3-10)*B8,0))
    >>> > Enter desired fluid rate for >20 kg in B9
    >>> > Calculate fluid rate in C9: =IF(B3>=20,(B3-20)*B9,0)
    >>> >
    >>> > Sum in cell C10 to get the total fluid rate: =SUM(C7:C9)
    >>> >
    >>> > MC
    >>> >
    >>> > "Robin" <Robin@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >>> > news:21AB90B5-C215-4E42-8E4E-9ADFFBAEB44C@microsoft.com...
    >>> >> Hi I don't know how to do this but I know it can be done. I want to
    >>> >> write a
    >>> >> simple macro (or maybe just a formula) - it doesn't have to look that
    >>> >> pretty
    >>> >> as I am the only one using it. It is the following:
    >>> >>
    >>> >> STEPS TO CALCULATE USUAL MAINTENANCE FLUIDS:
    >>> >> 1. Convert child's wt in lbs to kg
    >>> >> 2. Calculate 100 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 1st 10 kg of wt
    >>> >> 3. Calculate 50 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for the 2nd 10 kg of wt
    >>> >> 4. Calculate 10 to 25 ml of fluid/kg/24 hr for each kg over 20 of wt
    >>> >> 5. Add the products of steps 2,3, and 4 to determine the ml of fluid
    >>> >> needed/24 hrs
    >>> >>
    >>> >>
    >>> >> So I want to be able to plug in a weight in pounds, and this "macro"
    >>> >> give
    >>> >> me
    >>> >> the individual answers for each step, then the total at the end. And
    >>> >> yes
    >>> >> I
    >>> >> can do it on paper all day long I just want to be able to do it
    >>> >> quicker
    >>> >> and
    >>> >> check myself.
    >>> >>
    >>> >> Thanks
    >>> >> Robin
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>

    >
    >




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