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Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

  1. #1
    Claire8
    Guest

    Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

  2. #2
    Bernard Liengme
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Only if you have the trees!
    To be serious, please tell what is a forest plot then we might be able to
    help
    best wishes
    --
    Bernard V Liengme
    www.stfx.ca/people/bliengme
    remove caps from email

    "Claire8" <Claire8@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:F067271C-7101-400D-B319-D490695F8103@microsoft.com...
    > Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint




  3. #3
    Claire8
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    it has a horizontal axis and the vertival axis in in the middle of that.
    There is a value which is plotted as a rectangle and then a range around it
    that is plotted like a SD as a line going through it...hard to describe. The
    axis is also not uniform ie it goes from 0.25 to 0.50 to 1.0

  4. #4
    Jon Peltier
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Any links to an example, so we can see one?

    - Jon
    -------
    Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    Peltier Technical Services
    Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    http://PeltierTech.com/
    _______


    Claire8 wrote:

    > it has a horizontal axis and the vertival axis in in the middle of that.
    > There is a value which is plotted as a rectangle and then a range around it
    > that is plotted like a SD as a line going through it...hard to describe. The
    > axis is also not uniform ie it goes from 0.25 to 0.50 to 1.0


  5. #5
    Gaj Vidmar
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Forest plots are an established way of presenting results of a statistical
    meta-analysis. They are basicly just type of error-bar plots, with error
    bars usually horizontal, (preferably) varying size of the symbol, and often
    an added vertical line. To clarify with an example: typically, the symbol
    would depict the odds ratio estimated from one study, the error bars would
    represent the limits of its (say, 95%) confidence interval, symbol size
    would reflect sample size (since a study with a larger sample ... - no space
    to explain statistics here), and the line would denote the odds ratio 1
    (corresponding to no effect - speaking very briefly thus simplicistically).
    Different studies reviewed in the meta-analyses would be depicted one above
    the other, perhaps ordered chronologically (or by the estimated OR).

    Of course, the arrangement can be rotated, i.e., vertical error bars and
    horizontal unity line. Also, with ORs, it is reasonable to make the numeric
    axis logarithmic, while with some other effect size measure one will leave
    it linear (for measures other than OR, the <no effect> line would, of
    course, also placed elsewhere, usually at 0). As another point, one can use
    different symbols for different directions of effect (if the topic
    researched happens to be that controversial), or at least for the studies
    showing stat. sig. effect vs. non-sig. ones.

    Anyway, from this brief description (for more, just google on "meta-analysis
    forest plot"; whoever is the original poster, he or she should first read
    extensively and thoroughly on meta-analysis, anyway), it should be clear
    that no special software is required for forest plots, and that Excel is
    actually very useful for constructing quite useful forrest plots.

    If one insists on "canned stuff", I believe the nice freeware basics stats
    package Merlin
    http://www.heckgrammar.kirklees.sch....ogy/merlin.htm
    does what it calls kyte-graphs, which might be used for the purpose of
    producing forest plots. If not, the package and the enthousiasts who
    developed it deserves credit anyway.

    As for professional stats packages, NCSS (at least the latest version) does
    forest plots as one of its advertised features.

    Hope this helps,

    Gaj Vidmar
    Univ. of Ljubljana, Fac. of Medicine, Inst. of Biomedical Informatics
    http://www.mf.uni-lj.si/ibmi-english [/biostat-center] [-> Software]

    "Jon Peltier" <jonREMOVExlmvp@peltierCAPStech.com> wrote in message
    news:OcuZwDkvFHA.3252@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Any links to an example, so we can see one?
    >
    > - Jon
    > -------
    > Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    > Peltier Technical Services
    > Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    > http://PeltierTech.com/
    > _______
    >
    >
    > Claire8 wrote:
    >
    > > it has a horizontal axis and the vertival axis in in the middle of that.
    > > There is a value which is plotted as a rectangle and then a range around

    it
    > > that is plotted like a SD as a line going through it...hard to describe.

    The
    > > axis is also not uniform ie it goes from 0.25 to 0.50 to 1.0




  6. #6
    Jon Peltier
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Any links to an example, so we can see one?

    - Jon
    -------
    Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    Peltier Technical Services
    Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    http://PeltierTech.com/
    _______


    Gaj Vidmar wrote:

    > Forest plots are an established way of presenting results of a statistical
    > meta-analysis. They are basicly just type of error-bar plots, with error
    > bars usually horizontal, (preferably) varying size of the symbol, and often
    > an added vertical line. To clarify with an example: typically, the symbol
    > would depict the odds ratio estimated from one study, the error bars would
    > represent the limits of its (say, 95%) confidence interval, symbol size
    > would reflect sample size (since a study with a larger sample ... - no space
    > to explain statistics here), and the line would denote the odds ratio 1
    > (corresponding to no effect - speaking very briefly thus simplicistically).
    > Different studies reviewed in the meta-analyses would be depicted one above
    > the other, perhaps ordered chronologically (or by the estimated OR).
    >
    > Of course, the arrangement can be rotated, i.e., vertical error bars and
    > horizontal unity line. Also, with ORs, it is reasonable to make the numeric
    > axis logarithmic, while with some other effect size measure one will leave
    > it linear (for measures other than OR, the <no effect> line would, of
    > course, also placed elsewhere, usually at 0). As another point, one can use
    > different symbols for different directions of effect (if the topic
    > researched happens to be that controversial), or at least for the studies
    > showing stat. sig. effect vs. non-sig. ones.
    >
    > Anyway, from this brief description (for more, just google on "meta-analysis
    > forest plot"; whoever is the original poster, he or she should first read
    > extensively and thoroughly on meta-analysis, anyway), it should be clear
    > that no special software is required for forest plots, and that Excel is
    > actually very useful for constructing quite useful forrest plots.
    >
    > If one insists on "canned stuff", I believe the nice freeware basics stats
    > package Merlin
    > http://www.heckgrammar.kirklees.sch....ogy/merlin.htm
    > does what it calls kyte-graphs, which might be used for the purpose of
    > producing forest plots. If not, the package and the enthousiasts who
    > developed it deserves credit anyway.
    >
    > As for professional stats packages, NCSS (at least the latest version) does
    > forest plots as one of its advertised features.
    >
    > Hope this helps,
    >
    > Gaj Vidmar
    > Univ. of Ljubljana, Fac. of Medicine, Inst. of Biomedical Informatics
    > http://www.mf.uni-lj.si/ibmi-english [/biostat-center] [-> Software]
    >
    > "Jon Peltier" <jonREMOVExlmvp@peltierCAPStech.com> wrote in message
    > news:OcuZwDkvFHA.3252@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >
    >>Any links to an example, so we can see one?
    >>
    >>- Jon
    >>-------
    >>Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    >>Peltier Technical Services
    >>Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    >>http://PeltierTech.com/
    >>_______
    >>
    >>
    >>Claire8 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>it has a horizontal axis and the vertival axis in in the middle of that.
    >>>There is a value which is plotted as a rectangle and then a range around

    >
    > it
    >
    >>>that is plotted like a SD as a line going through it...hard to describe.

    >
    > The
    >
    >>>axis is also not uniform ie it goes from 0.25 to 0.50 to 1.0

    >
    >
    >


  7. #7
    Andy Pope
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Here's an example *** description.
    http://www.childrens-mercy.org/stats...orestPlots.asp

    Looks like a bubble chart with custom markers(square and diamond) for
    the weighting and custom x error bars for the confidence intervals.

    Cheers
    Andy

    Jon Peltier wrote:
    > Any links to an example, so we can see one?
    >
    > - Jon
    > -------
    > Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    > Peltier Technical Services
    > Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    > http://PeltierTech.com/
    > _______
    >
    >
    > Gaj Vidmar wrote:
    >
    >> Forest plots are an established way of presenting results of a
    >> statistical
    >> meta-analysis. They are basicly just type of error-bar plots, with error
    >> bars usually horizontal, (preferably) varying size of the symbol, and
    >> often
    >> an added vertical line. To clarify with an example: typically, the symbol
    >> would depict the odds ratio estimated from one study, the error bars
    >> would
    >> represent the limits of its (say, 95%) confidence interval, symbol size
    >> would reflect sample size (since a study with a larger sample ... - no
    >> space
    >> to explain statistics here), and the line would denote the odds ratio 1
    >> (corresponding to no effect - speaking very briefly thus
    >> simplicistically).
    >> Different studies reviewed in the meta-analyses would be depicted one
    >> above
    >> the other, perhaps ordered chronologically (or by the estimated OR).
    >>
    >> Of course, the arrangement can be rotated, i.e., vertical error bars and
    >> horizontal unity line. Also, with ORs, it is reasonable to make the
    >> numeric
    >> axis logarithmic, while with some other effect size measure one will
    >> leave
    >> it linear (for measures other than OR, the <no effect> line would, of
    >> course, also placed elsewhere, usually at 0). As another point, one
    >> can use
    >> different symbols for different directions of effect (if the topic
    >> researched happens to be that controversial), or at least for the studies
    >> showing stat. sig. effect vs. non-sig. ones.
    >>
    >> Anyway, from this brief description (for more, just google on
    >> "meta-analysis
    >> forest plot"; whoever is the original poster, he or she should first read
    >> extensively and thoroughly on meta-analysis, anyway), it should be clear
    >> that no special software is required for forest plots, and that Excel is
    >> actually very useful for constructing quite useful forrest plots.
    >>
    >> If one insists on "canned stuff", I believe the nice freeware basics
    >> stats
    >> package Merlin
    >> http://www.heckgrammar.kirklees.sch....ogy/merlin.htm
    >>
    >> does what it calls kyte-graphs, which might be used for the purpose of
    >> producing forest plots. If not, the package and the enthousiasts who
    >> developed it deserves credit anyway.
    >>
    >> As for professional stats packages, NCSS (at least the latest version)
    >> does
    >> forest plots as one of its advertised features.
    >>
    >> Hope this helps,
    >>
    >> Gaj Vidmar
    >> Univ. of Ljubljana, Fac. of Medicine, Inst. of Biomedical Informatics
    >> http://www.mf.uni-lj.si/ibmi-english [/biostat-center] [-> Software]
    >>
    >> "Jon Peltier" <jonREMOVExlmvp@peltierCAPStech.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OcuZwDkvFHA.3252@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    >>
    >>> Any links to an example, so we can see one?
    >>>
    >>> - Jon
    >>> -------
    >>> Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    >>> Peltier Technical Services
    >>> Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    >>> http://PeltierTech.com/
    >>> _______
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Claire8 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> it has a horizontal axis and the vertival axis in in the middle of
    >>>> that.
    >>>> There is a value which is plotted as a rectangle and then a range
    >>>> around

    >>
    >>
    >> it
    >>
    >>>> that is plotted like a SD as a line going through it...hard to
    >>>> describe.

    >>
    >>
    >> The
    >>
    >>>> axis is also not uniform ie it goes from 0.25 to 0.50 to 1.0

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>


    --

    Andy Pope, Microsoft MVP - Excel
    http://www.andypope.info

  8. #8
    Jon Peltier
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Oh, that's not too bad.

    Bubble chart with custom markers: make the bubble chart, draw the
    desired shape in the worksheet, copy it, select the series, and paste.
    Wow, square bubbles. The diamond is also a custom marker. See also

    http://peltiertech.com/Excel/ChartsH...omMarkers.html

    Custom error bars:

    http://peltiertech.com/Excel/ChartsHowTo/ErrorBars.html

    The dashed vertical line is an error bar on the diamond. the vertical
    line at 1 can either be the category axis crossing at 1, or an error bar
    on an invisible point. A bubble chart can't have an XY series as part
    of a combination chart, as I like to do in my charts, but you can use a
    bubble chart series for this with no border and no fill. Otherwise, any
    of these error bar techniques for adding a line would work fine:

    http://peltiertech.com/Excel/Charts/AddLine.html

    - Jon
    -------
    Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    Peltier Technical Services
    Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    http://PeltierTech.com/
    _______


    Andy Pope wrote:
    > Here's an example *** description.
    > http://www.childrens-mercy.org/stats...orestPlots.asp
    >
    > Looks like a bubble chart with custom markers(square and diamond) for
    > the weighting and custom x error bars for the confidence intervals.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Andy
    >
    > Jon Peltier wrote:
    >
    >> Any links to an example, so we can see one?
    >>
    >> - Jon
    >> -------
    >> Jon Peltier, Microsoft Excel MVP
    >> Peltier Technical Services
    >> Tutorials and Custom Solutions
    >> http://PeltierTech.com/
    >> _______
    >>


  9. #9
    Ed Ferrero
    Guest

    Re: Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint

    Hi Claire8,

    It takes a combined stacked bar chart and scatter chart but, yes - Forest
    Plots can be done in Excel. I have placed a very basic sample at
    http://edferrero.m6.net/charting.aspx called Forest Plots. Let me know if
    this is useful.

    Ed Ferrero
    http://edferrero.m6.net/

    > Forest Plots......can these be done in excel or powerpoint




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